WHITEHALL ROMAN VILLA AND LANDSCAPE PROJECT

 


Reassembled pots
assembled and conserved by volunteers Jane McCarthy and Martin Weaver

Whitehall lies in the Upper Nene Valley, so Lower Nene Valley pots were traded relatively locally.

Large indented beaker

Lower Nene Valley

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Black burnished simple rim bowl

Late 3rd - early 4th century.
A Fineware Flagon

A Nene Valley colour-coated flagon or jug used in the bath house. It had been deliberately broken and left on deposition, possibly as a votive offering during reconstruction of the east end of the bath house range. The form was manufactured during the early 4th century.

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Fineware dish

A samian dish (form 32) with plain curving sides and a footring. The form is mainly East Gaulish in manufacture and is late 2nd to mid 3rd century. See below for detail of the stamp visible in the middle of the dish.

Potter's stamp on above dish

Samian vessels are often stamped with the names of the workshops or individual potters who made them. On plain vessels these marks usually appear on the basal interior as a central mark.

Greyware jar base

This is quite a fine wheel-made pot in a blue-grey fabric with a self-coloured slip. Lower Nene Valley, late 2nd century.

Samian cup (drag 33)

Small drinking vessel, late 2nd - early 3rd century.
Miniature ointment jar

With painted decoration.
Lower Nene Valley, 4th century.
Rough cast beaker

Lower Nene Valley, late 3rd early - 4th century.
Indented beaker

From the North Western Provinces, late 3rd - early 4th century.

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Three small indented beakers

Rheinish, late 3rd century.

Indented beaker
(top right above)

Rheinish, late 3rd century.

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A 'table setting' using our reconstructed pots

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